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  • sgoff - Tuesday 26 September 2017 16:41
    Dear All

    This months walk is a moderate 9 mile walk from Marsden to Slaithwaite the walk will mostly follow the Kirklees Way over the moors to Scammonden Water. Please note there are some muddy boggy sections but equally there are some good hard surfaces, the walk may be shortened if the weather turns bad. You never know we might enjoy a dry spell over the next two weeks! Please wear suitable gear though.

    Please meet at Manchester Victoria at 10: 40am in order to catch the 10:57 to Marsden, arrive 11:29. a ticket to Slaithwaite is required as we are going to end up there after the walk.Day return to Slaithwaite is £10:50. The last stop for a Wayfarer is Greenfield the stop before Marsden. Please buy a ticket that meets your own personal circumstances. As the Marsden train starts from Preston I will be already on it in the first carriage.

    The return trains are
    18:23 arrive Manchester Victoria 19:06.
    18:33 arrive Manchester Victoria 19:30
    19:22 arrive Manchester Victoria 20:06
    20:22 arrive Manchester Victoria 21:05
    21:22 arrive Manchester Victoria 22:04

    The pubs of the day are

    Rose and Crown , Cop Hill, four hand pumps please note this pub is 3/4 of the way round after approx 6 to 7 miles. The only pub stop on the walk.
    The Commercial and The Shoulder of Mutton both Slaithwaite at least six hand pumps on at each. Please note there is a chippy in Slaithwaite open to 8 pm.

    Please contact me by email or on my mobile 07949550751 if you have any enquiries.

    Cheers

    Alan
  • sgoff - Tuesday 26 September 2017 16:43
    O.C.O.T. Minutes

    17th March 2017

    Marsden / Slaithwaite

    Present: Adrian Hammond, Syd Bennett, David Burrows, Andy Fildes, Steve Goff, Adi Hammond, Trevor Heywood, Robert Holmes, Larry Johnson, Kevin Jordan, Alan Larsen, Colin Larsen, John Nelson, Noel O’Toole, Tony Statham, Dave Whittle, Mike Whittle

    The expectation of inclement weather had come to fruition as we stepped onto Marsden station’s platform disembarking from the 10.57 Manchester Victoria service. The previous evening’s forecast had warned of a driving 30 mph headwind although at our elevation it was more likely to have been somewhere between 40 and 50 mph.

    Our moderate nine miles walk today would take us, to use local vernacular, to the village of Slawit. The route would be in the main over the moors following the Kirklees way and passing Scammonden water.

    The weather began to deteriorate rapidly as we headed along the Kirklees Way and, partly as a consequence of this, we were to suffer the day’s first casualty: Steve. He apparently began to feel unwell and found it necessary to curtail the walk prematurely. He was joined with one or two others who acted as aides whilst he was shepherded towards Marsden.

    The remaining stalwart members steadfastly continued the walk. However, shortly after the earlier incident, Alan acknowledged the rapidly deteriorating weather and, during a brief soggy lunch break, took the opportunity of offering the rain sodden individuals an alternative exit strategy by outlining an abridged return route to Slawit. A few members seized the opportunity with some eagerness. They were though left in no doubt from the remainder of the group that this behaviour was regarded as unbecoming and that it fell short of the standard expected from professional walkers!

    Following the group schism, the courageous remainder, undeterred and heads bowed, continued with unflinching stoicism. Sometime later, we stumbled upon some semblance of civilisation and began to descend from the moors and headed towards the Rose and Crown inn located in Cop Hill, on the periphery of Slawit. The final part of the descent took us down a rain drenched, lichen covered cobbled lane. The near lethal combination of the greasy, wet lichen covered surface offered negligible traction between boot soles and the cobbles. The collective looks of concentration, on members’ faces, as they navigated their way over the cobbles was a sight to behold.

    Upon arrival at the inn, the group had become fragmented and the leading few members were the first to enter the bar. After several minutes of divestment and undressing of rain soaked outerwear, drinks were bought from the bar. It seemed to be some time later when the next group of members arrived and at which point we were appraised of the calamity that had befallen one member. In fact, the member in question was none other than the illustrious Secretary Larsen. He had suffered the misfortune and ignominy of having lost his footing on the wet cobbles. It turned out that his accident had occurred on an incline. His fall had resulted in his right hand temple area of his head having borne and absorbed almost the entire impact of his fall. The huge, ovoid shaped lump on his head was surely testament to the severity of the impact. Colin entered the bar area, looking slightly dazed and giving the impression of not being entirely compos mentis, immediately sat down. Concerned members began to insist that he ought to visit the local accident and emergency ward of the local infirmary. Almost unbelievably, he was able to hold a lucid and coherent conversation, which, later in the evening we all agreed was something of a novelty! Following a period of reflection over his injurious predicament, Colin demurred regarding a visit to the local hospital that evening and that he would assess his injury the following morning and decide upon his course of action at that point.

    Our departure from the Rose and Crown saw several members avail themselves of transport to the centre of Slawit whilst others decided to walk. The ever enterprising Adrian, as he was about to leave the inn, caught the attention of a concerned female customer and received an offer of a lift into the town centre.

    Our final two hostelry visits included the Commercial and the Shoulder of Mutton.

    Everybody thanked Alan for our safe deliverance to Slaithwaite following an abysmal wet walk. It was with some regret that we were unable to enjoy what ought to have been a scenic hike across the Kirklees moors.
  • sgoff - Tuesday 26 September 2017 16:44
    O.C.O.T. Minutes

    17th March 2017

    Marsden / Slaithwaite

    Present: Adrian Hammond, Syd Bennett, David Burrows, Andy Fildes, Steve Goff, Adi Hammond, Trevor Heywood, Robert Holmes, Larry Johnson, Kevin Jordan, Alan Larsen, Colin Larsen, John Nelson, Noel O’Toole, Tony Statham, Dave Whittle, Mike Whittle

    The expectation of inclement weather had come to fruition as we stepped onto Marsden station’s platform disembarking from the 10.57 Manchester Victoria service. The previous evening’s forecast had warned of a driving 30 mph headwind although at our elevation it was more likely to have been somewhere between 40 and 50 mph.

    Our moderate nine miles walk today would take us, to use local vernacular, to the village of Slawit. The route would be in the main over the moors following the Kirklees way and passing Scammonden water.

    The weather began to deteriorate rapidly as we headed along the Kirklees Way and, partly as a consequence of this, we were to suffer the day’s first casualty: Steve. He apparently began to feel unwell and found it necessary to curtail the walk prematurely. He was joined with one or two others who acted as aides whilst he was shepherded towards Marsden.

    The remaining stalwart members steadfastly continued the walk. However, shortly after the earlier incident, Alan acknowledged the rapidly deteriorating weather and, during a brief soggy lunch break, took the opportunity of offering the rain sodden individuals an alternative exit strategy by outlining an abridged return route to Slawit. A few members seized the opportunity with some eagerness. They were though left in no doubt from the remainder of the group that this behaviour was regarded as unbecoming and that it fell short of the standard expected from professional walkers!

    Following the group schism, the courageous remainder, undeterred and heads bowed, continued with unflinching stoicism. Sometime later, we stumbled upon some semblance of civilisation and began to descend from the moors and headed towards the Rose and Crown inn located in Cop Hill, on the periphery of Slawit. The final part of the descent took us down a rain drenched, lichen covered cobbled lane. The near lethal combination of the greasy, wet lichen covered surface offered negligible traction between boot soles and the cobbles. The collective looks of concentration, on members’ faces, as they navigated their way over the cobbles was a sight to behold.

    Upon arrival at the inn, the group had become fragmented and the leading few members were the first to enter the bar. After several minutes of divestment and undressing of rain soaked outerwear, drinks were bought from the bar. It seemed to be some time later when the next group of members arrived and at which point we were appraised of the calamity that had befallen one member. In fact, the member in question was none other than the illustrious Secretary Larsen. He had suffered the misfortune and ignominy of having lost his footing on the wet cobbles. It turned out that his accident had occurred on an incline. His fall had resulted in his right hand temple area of his head having borne and absorbed almost the entire impact of his fall. The huge, ovoid shaped lump on his head was surely testament to the severity of the impact. Colin entered the bar area, looking slightly dazed and giving the impression of not being entirely compos mentis, immediately sat down. Concerned members began to insist that he ought to visit the local accident and emergency ward of the local infirmary. Almost unbelievably, he was able to hold a lucid and coherent conversation, which, later in the evening we all agreed was something of a novelty! Following a period of reflection over his injurious predicament, Colin demurred regarding a visit to the local hospital that evening and that he would assess his injury the following morning and decide upon his course of action at that point.

    Our departure from the Rose and Crown saw several members avail themselves of transport to the centre of Slawit whilst others decided to walk. The ever enterprising Adrian, as he was about to leave the inn, caught the attention of a concerned female customer and received an offer of a lift into the town centre.

    Our final two hostelry visits included the Commercial and the Shoulder of Mutton.

    Everybody thanked Alan for our safe deliverance to Slaithwaite following an abysmal wet walk. It was with some regret that we were unable to enjoy what ought to have been a scenic hike across the Kirklees moors.